Episode 087: Learning Azure with Gwyneth Pena | CloudSkills.fm

In this episode I catch up with Azure MVP Gwyneth Pena to discuss how you can get started on your journey into the Azure cloud.

Gwyneth Pena is a Cloud Consultant, content creator, and Microsoft Azure MVP. Before deciding to work for herself, Gwyn was a Cloud Engineer at an Energy startup and was responsible for all the company’s Azure Infrastructure. She is an advocate for diversity and inclusiveness in the field and creates content not only on skills she’s learned, certifications she’s studying for, but also shares her story and tips that helped her get into the field.

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Full Transcript:

Mike Pfeiffer:
So when we booked you on the show, you were working somewhere, and then I also saw since then, since we booked you on the show, you’ve not only left your job, but you’re now a Microsoft Azure MVP. Is that right?

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. Yes, that is correct.

Mike Pfeiffer:
That’s awesome. Congratulations.

Gwyneth Pena:
Thank you. Thank you. It was a pretty, almost back to back. I think I officially quit my full time around the 17th of last month. And then the MVP thing came in maybe like two weeks after that or so, and it caught me off guard. I knew I was nominated, but it was like months ago and I kind of like forgot about it. And the email came in on a Saturday morning while I was doing work and I was just shocked really. But it’s a surreal feeling and it’s cool. I know a lot of MVPs already. I talk to a bunch of them. I’ve learned a lot from a bunch of them. So kind of just coming to the idea that I’m one right now is still a little bit of like, it’s kind of like imposter syndrome, but it’s pretty cool. Yeah.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Yeah. It is kind of surreal, to get the email and all that kind of stuff, but it speaks volumes because obviously people recognize what you’re working on and for anybody that doesn’t really know you, what have you been working on? And what do you think was it that kind of got you on the radar and turned you into an MVP?

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah, that’s a interesting question. People ask me like, “Hey, how did you become an MVP?” And to me, it was like when I was starting, so a bunch of it comes from just the content that I create. I started my YouTube channel perhaps four or five months ago or so. And it was mainly just for me to document stuff that I was doing really. I was employed as a full time cloud engineer back when I started that, and then now I’m doing kind of the same stuff on my own, but I was really just documenting stuff that I was learning and implementing. And then I think I had posted a video on Reddit or something like that. And one of the engineers on the Azure functions team at Microsoft found it, shared it on Twitter, followed me. And then, you know how things on like social media just kind of like share themselves after the right person does it for you?

Mike Pfeiffer:
That’s right. Yep.

Gwyneth Pena:
And after that, I had just had a bunch of different eyes just watching my stuff. I was consistently putting out videos on different topics about Azure, kind of like every week, if I could do two a week, I would definitely do them. And then overall I developed my style, making content and making videos and just explaining stuff that I liked. And it just kind of took off on its own, I guess, whatever attention that I do have. And then I was approached by, it was back in February, I believe, so they were like, “Hey, I think you’re great for MVP. You have like a lot of content. You’re really helping the community.” And they kind of nominated me. I was like a dev advocate at Microsoft and yeah, that kind of just took off on its own, really.

Gwyneth Pena:
I didn’t really have the intention to become an MVP. Not because I didn’t want to, but just because the thought of it, this is one of those things where it wasn’t a goal, but it happened and I didn’t even think it was possible, I guess. But yeah, just consistently making quality content, putting it out there, sharing it, being open to questions, being open to feedback. It was definitely a lot of work. And I know you more than anybody know that it might be like a 10, 20 minute video, but behind that there’s hours and hours of work.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Video is hard, man. It’s like the hardest thing to put together. To produce video is insanely hard.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah, definitely.

Mike Pfeiffer:
But it’s a great way to connect with an audience, which obviously you’ve been able to do. Was that something you were doing in your work prior to this? Or was it something you had to figure out and how to get your knowledge out there? What was that like, getting into YouTube and doing that kind of stuff?

Gwyneth Pena:
So I have a little bit of an interesting background I used to, well, I still make music, I produce music and I have a lot of friends who do it professionally. So I learned editing audio and putting together video in a way because of that background. And I was kind of searching for a way to sort of like feed those creative juices with my engineering career, because I love the field, but there’s just some part of me that was missing. So then I was like, “Oh, well, why don’t I make videos about the stuff that I’m doing?” And then I just watched a bunch of YouTube tutorials, that’s how everyone learns anything these days. And yeah, I put it together.

Gwyneth Pena:
I learned OBS, Adobe Premiere, Final Cut. And yeah, I started looking into what it takes to create an actual video and writing the scripts and then all the research that you have to put into and all that stuff too. But yeah, creating content in general, I get that from my music production days, but yeah, it’s quite a journey, it’s hard. And I wouldn’t say I’m great at it, I think I’m okay at it. And there’s just other people who blow me out of the water, but it’s been a very rewarding thing to learn.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Yeah, totally. I look at some of those videos on YouTube. I’m like, man, the production quality is so good, but I think the content is ultimately, I think, especially in this space, what matters the most and when I saw you were doing some serverless stuff, is that kind of like your niche or you doing more certification stuff or what are you working on specifically?

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah, so I started off doing a lot of serverless things, specifically Azure functions because it was what I was working at the time with at my job. I had implemented a bunch of solutions using Azure functions. And since that material was fresh on my mind, I figured I would just throw a bunch of videos onto YouTube about them. I wouldn’t say my interests moved because I miss making videos on Azure functions, but I’m more focused now on getting certain certifications, like Azure certifications. And since I’m studying them, there’s no better way to study and to teach yourself than to teach others and making a video is a great way to do that. You’re putting together notes and then you got to turn it into something that you can actually explain, which is different than notes.

Gwyneth Pena:
Putting that up on YouTube has been great as well because it becomes a free resource for other people who may need help studying, or just want to see a little bit of what the material is about and everything like that. But I would say I’m not specific to anything. I just like cloud computing in general, because I try to also use the channel to speak about like how I got into the field, what are some things that I believe you should know about to get into the field, and just a little bit of my back ground.

Mike Pfeiffer:
So it’s not just like the binary stuff, excuse me.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. It’s not just technical because I feel like there’s a lot of great, amazing technical material out there that there are specific people who are going to be way better at that than I am, but I just feel like you got to bring your own uniqueness and whatever your story is and a little bit more of a maybe transparency into the field. And if I could do that with the content, that’s definitely a goal of mine.

Mike Pfeiffer:
I think that too, I think more honesty is one of the things that’s hard to do, but I think that people that are approaching it that way are going to be the ones that are going to be leading because that’s what we want the most right now, I think.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Anyways, going back to what you were saying, how you got into the industry and you said you were working as a cloud engineer, all that kind of stuff, would love to hear kind of like the origin story. How’d you get into IT and how’d you end up in cloud?

Gwyneth Pena:
Okay. I’ll try to keep it brief because everyone has a long story. But yeah, I was living in South America, in Ecuador, that’s where my family’s from. So I’m originally from here, Connecticut, but then I moved over there and I graduated high school-

Gwyneth Pena:
… but then I moved over there and I graduated high school, went into like my first year of computer science in college. And I guess I was a kid and I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. So I dropped out and I was like, “Well, what am I going to do now?” I like computers, and I do like programming, but I wasn’t necessarily in love with coding. I didn’t want to do it every single day for hours, but I wasn’t really aware of these cloud computing kind of roles or anything like that. So I moved back to the States. I landed a job at an Apple store and then eventually a help desk job. And at the help desk job, if you had free time, like you finished all your tasks, they would let you kind of just hop on any other team and see what they were doing.

Gwyneth Pena:
And I was really cool with the people on the infrastructure team, and they were moving some stuff into AWS. So they would let me kind of just watch what they were doing and explain things. And someone brought up like, “Hey, if you’re interested, why don’t you get like AWS certified or something?” And I was just like, “What are you talking about?” So then I studied for the AWS, I think it was a certified developer associate. This was maybe three, four years ago. So the whole like certification space and all of the certification content was kind of brand new still. There wasn’t nearly as much as what there is now.

Mike Pfeiffer:
There wasn’t much AWS developer stuff back then. It was hard to find that type of content. Yeah.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. I remember I had a technical background, I guess, but completely brand new into cloud, maybe took me three, four months of just studying every single day for like several hours after the help desk job. And once I got certification, I was like, “All right, I want to find roles that’ll give me exposure to the field.” And I wasn’t necessarily looking for any role that had like cloud in the title. Just any job description that I had gave me exposure to those projects. And I ended up landing a junior sys admin role, and I was still doing kind of like all over the place tasks, but they were moving their stuff into Azure. So I was really able to kind of just hop on any project that I wanted to help on because it was a medium sized company.

Gwyneth Pena:
So when you work at it like smaller to medium sized company, there’s opportunities to work on everything. And that could be a good or bad thing depending on what fits for you. So I remember that year or a little bit over a year that I was just hopping on any project that I could, working overtime, getting as much exposure as I possibly could. And eventually they were like, “Hey, you’re good at this. You’re interested, let’s promote you into a cloud engineer. And that way you can focus your time fully in our Azure infrastructure.” And yeah, that’s where I was, up until like a month ago, then I became self-employed. But I guess that’s my short story of how I got here.

Mike Pfeiffer:
That’s awesome. I love it. I think a lot of people can relate to that. A lot of people I know in IT and for myself too, it was kind of like that. Where it wasn’t expecting really to get into IT, but when the opportunity came up, it was kind of like hustling, just like you were talking about. Showing your interest and having some passion. That’s the one thing that hiring managers can’t teach you. So that’s a good message for people out there to hear. So kind of switching gears just a little bit, on your channel, outside of the tech stuff, what are you talking about on there? Are you helping people out with like resume stuff or is it more soft skills? Just your background, stuff like that?

Gwyneth Pena:
So I wouldn’t necessarily describe it in any particular way. I kind of just talk about the things that have worked for me, but I never like to say, come to me for interviewing skills or come to me, I’ll take your resume. I always try to attack any kind of topic that I want to talk about as, “This is what works for me. This is how it worked for me. This is what I did that worked for me.”

Mike Pfeiffer:
So career tips. Stuff that’s worked for you, things that people could latch on, tips. Cool.

Gwyneth Pena:
And this might work for you as well, but I’m not saying I’m guaranteeing you anything. I really try to avoid like the click baity stuff on YouTube and the easy to make content. Not necessarily because it’s bad, but it’s just not my thing. I’d rather make something that I’m very happy with. So you’ll see my videos are super concise, there’s no like fluff or anything like that. And I’ve gotten a lot of feedback of people. This is a comment that I get the most, “I really appreciate that you’ve just cut the fluff out.” And even to like my editing style, if there’s an extended pause, I’ll cut that out. Because I know, these days, we’re already stressed with trying to find jobs or trying to know what we need to learn and the last thing you want to do is hop on a video that’s 20 minutes long and it’s only five minutes of content.

Mike Pfeiffer:
That’s right. It’s so crushing when you see like too many minutes or hours on the screen. And then you’re double speeding it and all that. Yeah. Respecting people’s time is huge. I love that actually.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yes. 1000%. And so in terms of the careers tips, what’s been like the biggest one you think, the most impactful? Or your biggest tip for somebody that’s listening, but maybe not so much focused or worried about the technical side, but more on the career side, maybe?

Gwyneth Pena:
The biggest tip for the career side?

Mike Pfeiffer:
Yeah. Your number one tip, I guess. Or something that you’ve talked about recently.

Gwyneth Pena:
That’s not technical? That’s a good question. I would say something that we don’t pay attention too much, because we’re always so focused on like, “Oh, I need to learn all the infrastructure as code options that are out there.” And, “Oh, I need to know all the cloud platforms.” We don’t take time to understand that you’re also a human being and you need to know how to interact with other human beings. And I know for a fact that what helped me is that I knew how to interview well.

Gwyneth Pena:
And I understood like being confident in an interview and really being able to speak to what you do know and being able to speak of what you don’t know and being honest, was a huge factor in me landing my first gig. So I would say, take some time to understand how to interview well and how to, I guess, be confident in presenting yourself in an interview. If you were to ask me my number one nontechnical skill, that would definitely be it.

Mike Pfeiffer:
That’s amazing advice. And I would echo that a million percent because I interview people not as much as I used to, but a fair amount. And when I worked at Amazon, I was constantly having to interview people because you just couldn’t hire enough people. And they really get detailed on it, and that was an eye opening experience for me. And I was a pretty good interviewer, even up to that point and working there and stuff. But it really shined a light on a many things that I didn’t realize.

Mike Pfeiffer:
And just like you said, being able to go in there and you have to sell yourself without being salesy. And it kind of just goes back to being competent in your skills and stuff and being okay with like putting your best foot forward. But being able to articulate it. I love that you said that, because communication is one of the top soft skill or interpersonal skills, managers want that too with the tech skills. And if you can’t go in there and be a human being, it’s kind of hard to get anybody to trust you.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. Well, it’s a lot harder to be a decent human being versus being a decent cloud engineer. Because you can learn all the technical skills. Spend a couple hours on YouTube everyday you learn. But how do you learn to be someone that you want to work with?

Mike Pfeiffer:
It’s so true, and especially now. Having worked in toxic workplaces, oh my God. I can tell you for sure. I would much rather work with people that are excited and ambitious, versus the people that want to like push out a project for six months so they don’t have to work an extra hour or something like that.

Mike Pfeiffer:
For six months so they don’t have to work an extra hour or something like that. But anyway, switching gears just a little bit, what are you most excited about right now on the tech side in Azure? Is it the certification stuff or …

Gwyneth Pena:
Oh man. I flip flop every day because their stuff comes out all the time. I know I’m kind of late to this, but I was just playing with, what is it? Static web apps.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Oh, yeah.

Gwyneth Pena:
I think they really [inaudible 00:16:27] during build.

Mike Pfeiffer:
It’s still new though for everybody.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. And I was like, “Man, if I could get just a little bit more time to just play around more with these things.” But right now I’m really more focused on the solution 303 is the architect exam certification. Really want to learn those. Maybe, what is it? 303. What’s the other one? 304?

Mike Pfeiffer:
Yeah. So those ones are in beta right now.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah.

Mike Pfeiffer:
And then when they go live, I think at the end of September, the current generation 300 and 301 will get retired.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. Those numbers are so confusing.

Mike Pfeiffer:
But they’re very similar. I know. The numbers thing is drive me crazy. One of the things that I’ve mentioned on this show before, me and Tim Warner and a bunch of other people coauthored the Easy 300 Book, and literally like six months after it went on the shelves, they were like, “Oh, we’re redoing the exam. It’s a new exam number.” And so we’re like, “Oh no.” That’s the struggle of a content creator. Right? Do you run into those things with your videos? Like you shoot something and the next day it changes and you got to edit it?

Gwyneth Pena:
I mean, I’ve noticed some things where it’s like, “Okay, now I have to readdress it.” But I haven’t really. I know I should, but it’s like, if you have that where you constantly need to update your stuff, it’s like when will you have time to put new stuff out, I guess.

Mike Pfeiffer:
You’ll only be patching, I guess. Right?

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. Yeah. So I don’t know. I guess it’s just the nature of the field. Kind of just have to go with it.

Mike Pfeiffer:
I think there’s a level at which it’s okay to let it get a little bit behind because some things will change in the portal, they’ll maybe move a couple of boxes around or change the interface a little bit. But sometimes you can still follow along. And I think in those cases, it’s all right. But if it’s completely different UI, completely different, then you got to reshoot it or something.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah, definitely.

Mike Pfeiffer:
So the cert stuff is what you’re working on right now. Are you enjoying that? And then also, I know that you’re participating in 100 days of cloud. We were kind of chatting about that before we started recording. Is that something maybe you could explain to everybody listening and also is that something you guys are doing certifications around or …

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. Yeah. So I guess they kind of go hand in hand as to me focusing on certifications and also being part of 100 days of cloud, which if you’re familiar with 100 days of code or 100 days of … There’s so many 100 days really out there now. Basically if you’re part of it, you’re committing yourself to 100 days of learning cloud computing and you could be studying towards a certification or maybe it’s a specific topic or you could be a newbie or a professional or someone just transitioning over to the field, but you’ve been like a dev or a network person. Yeah. But really anybody, you’re committing yourself to 100 days.

Gwyneth Pena:
The easiest way that I think to get knowledge for the cloud is through a certification just because there’s so much to learn. And at least you have sort of an outline, maybe there’s specific content that’ll explain the entire certification or everything that goes into it. But again, you don’t have to. But I’m studying currently for the 303 and also doing the 100 days of cloud kind of thing, and really also creating content around what I’m studying and sharing it with people who are part of the challenge. Yeah, it’s a lot. It’s a lot. I’m kind of envious of the people who can just study and not really have to do more, because I’m pushing myself to create content around it and share it with others and things like that. But it’s been very rewarding. I definitely feel like I’m learning more, especially with infrastructure. It’s just, there’s just so much. Currently I’m in the networking section and it’s just like, “Oh goodness.”

Mike Pfeiffer:
Yeah, the networking is always tough.

Gwyneth Pena:
I could spend a whole year on just networking.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Totally. Yeah. It’s hard, man. We’ve talked about that on this show a little bit. I feel lucky in a lot of ways because of the background that I’ve gotten, because if I was starting from scratch, I would be lost on the networking stuff. But that’s really awesome. So if somebody is listening to this, they haven’t heard of 100 days of cloud, how do they get started with that? Like you go to a website and sign up? How do you get engaged with that?

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. So 100daysofcloud.com is really your go to. And we also have a YouTube, I believe it’s … Well, I don’t know if we have a custom … Anyway, go to 100daysofcloud.com and at the top, there’s going to be a YouTube playlist that kind of gets you going. There’s videos on what the challenge is about, how to use the GitHub repo, because we also have a repo that you can utilize to track your progress and to also create content around all the progress that you’re making. We also have an ideas repo. So if you’re looking for projects to work on, we have different projects on Azure, GCP, AWS, all in there in a bunch of different topics, like serverless in just computing, security, and a bunch of other things in there.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. So your best bet is 100daysofcloud.com. There’s also a discord. I think today we might’ve hit almost 500 members in there, which is wild because it started like a month ago and it just kind of took off. Yeah, we have channels in there. People from AWS, people from Microsoft, people from GCP, people from Oracle are in there chatting. And if you have questions you can ask there. I’m in there. The thing about a chat in general is once you kind of get into one, you’re kind of just there. It’s like a rabbit hole. Right? So I try to not be all the time in there, but I do check in. I would say I do check in daily. But yeah, 100daysofcloud.com

Mike Pfeiffer:
Yeah. When you’re trying to sit down and build new YouTube videos, it’s kind of hard to answer IMs and reply to text messages and all that kind of stuff. So that’s cool though. So the people can go to 100daysofcloud.com. They just follow along with one lesson a day. Do you pick your flavor of cloud and then go down the path? Or is it just kind of a random mix?

Gwyneth Pena:
So it’s its cloud in general. Typically if you’re brand new, I say stick to one. But ideally you would identify what you want to learn and you kind of just commit yourself to that for 100 days. When you think about it, 100 days to learn something, it’s a lot of time, but it’s also not because you can get a lot of high level knowledge in 100 days, especially if you’re brand new, but then also you have all your little rabbit holes where it’s like, “All right, today I learned about VMs,” but then there’s also a lot more to VMs and things like that. Right? So yeah, it’s kind of like just pick something to learn about during that day, as long as it’s cloud computing related, and then just document it.

Gwyneth Pena:
And at the end of the day, you’re going to have 100 days of content that you’ve learned and you could share. And then eventually, maybe you could use that for your blog. I mean, it’s going to be on your GitHub. Oh, that’s another maybe nontechnical tip that I highly recommend. Put yourself out there in some way, if it’s in a written form like a blog or you’re doing YouTube like me, do YouTube or maybe do a podcast or something like that. It’s opened up so many doors for me, really career changing for myself. So I would highly recommend just document what you’re learning. No better way to get yourself out there. Yeah.

Mike Pfeiffer:
That’s really cool, man, because-

Gwyneth Pena:
No better way to get yourself out there. Yeah.

Mike Pfeiffer:
That’s really cool, man, because it’s so true. I remember when I started my blog, I didn’t think anyone would care.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Well, I didn’t go viral as much as you did, but it took me a little bit more time. I had to learn how to actually produce content. I had no idea what I was doing and I was just blogging at first. The video stuff over the last couple of years has also been a big challenge, like doing screencast videos even. It’s a lot, man, to go and edit a video and then start trying to build an entire course around it. It’s just a lot of work, but it is rewarding. And I think what you said is important is just getting into it, chunking it out a little bit, stringing that out over a long period of time. Next thing you know, you’ve got all this momentum behind you and it’s like, whoa, I know way more than I did three months ago. It goes by fast, right?

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. Yeah, definitely, definitely.

Gwyneth Pena:
Also, I would say putting yourself out there, especially with video, it kind of helps you. Because I remember at the beginning when I was creating YouTube content, I was like, I don’t want to be on camera. I feel like I’m embarrassing myself, when nowadays I’d be like, throw the camera on, let’s record, whatever. Let’s just get it done. So it builds like confidence in you, and then you learn to sort of talk about specifically, like how to explain things and you develop your own style and you kind of learn how you like to express yourself and how you like to put yourself out there. Yes. I totally recommend doing that.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Yeah. That’s hard to, especially in IT when so many people are introverted, the camera could be like a really terrifying thing. But I agree.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah, I get that.

Mike Pfeiffer:
The thing that’s funny, I always think about this. Anytime I ever get reservations about video or anything, I’m like in 20 years, every single person on the planet is going to be doing this and they’re going to think I’m silly if I could talk to them right now because I won’t do this. This is where everything is going. It’s like, why am I freaking out about this so much? It’s kind of cool to think about it that way for me because I’m like, oh, okay, this isn’t that bad.

Mike Pfeiffer:
I mean, just getting something out there is important. I think GitHub profile, like you said, is essential for [crosstalk 00:02:05]. There’s no reason not to have a GitHub profile and set up some repos because you don’t have to just write code. You could put, like you said, tutorials in there, document what you’re learning. It’s great advice.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah, definitely.

Mike Pfeiffer:
So what’s next on the horizon? Are you working on any other things coming out? I thought I heard something. You mentioned earlier, something about a podcast project you were working on.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah, it’s still in a little, little baby, I guess. It’s an idea that I’m developing, but once it’s out or no, maybe, I guess. Okay. So here’s my insight for it. I think audio is kind of just, more than video, audio is just the wave of the future for educational content I believe. So I just think there’s a bit of a niche there for in terms of like cloud computing, audio content, but that isn’t a whole course, like a whole nine hours kind of thing.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Right.

Gwyneth Pena:
Just like think of like a podcast. You throw it on in the morning, you’re maybe listening to it with your coffee and why not take advantage of learning a little something about maybe an Azure service during like, I don’t know, 15 minutes of your time. So that’s what I’m working on. It’s a lot. Just like creating YouTube videos or any content in general, you don’t really know how much work goes into it until you’re actually doing it and then just things keep popping up, up, up. But I’m hoping to have that out maybe in the next two weeks or so.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Very cool.

Gwyneth Pena:
Besides that, I keep making my videos on YouTube, keep creating content for a hundred days of cloud. I also want to make, like I mentioned, we have the ideas repo and I want to make tutorials based off like the projects that we have in there and just make it a more and more inviting community to other people and yeah. I mean, I still am a cloud engineer. I have like two clients that I’m working with now. So that’s like the stuff that I do during the day and in the afternoons dedicated to content. So there’s a lot going on, but also there’s just a lot of opportunities that I don’t necessarily want to push away just because I guess “I’m busy”, but yeah. There’s just a lot going on, really.

Mike Pfeiffer:
A lot going on. Yeah. I like what you said about the audio stuff. I agree obviously with the podcast and everything, but what’s interesting to me is, well, number one, podcasting is up in general, like over the last couple of years, just because everybody’s so busy right. Now, you can consume content when, just to your point, you’re making dinner, breakfast, you’re at the gym. I’m actually using the Alexa in my house way more than I did before. Just cause I’m getting more used to asking like what time it is in some other country to understand I got a call coming up and what is it that that guy in right now and like just different random things where I’m asking the voice devices and it’s adding value because now I didn’t have to pick up my phone. And so I do agree with you there.

Mike Pfeiffer:
And then the other interesting thing is I actually got an email earlier this week from Amazon and they’re like, yeah, we’re doing podcasts now on Amazon music, so submit your podcasts. So I submitted this podcast, so it shows up. We’ll hopefully at some point show up in Amazon music, but they’re still trying to figure that out. But eventually podcasts, it sounds like they’re going to be on Amazon music, which is amazing.

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. That space is interesting. There’s just so much potential there, especially within our space. I think, there’s a few like pretty big like cloud computing podcasts, but it’s still compared to like every other field, it’s still pretty small. So there’s a lot of potential there.

Mike Pfeiffer:
I think it’s good to know that or just for people to think about the different modalities and where they can communicate in this ecosystem, right, because some people might teaching, but other people might just be sharing their experience on projects. I’d listen to that. If you were just on there once a week, sharing 20 minutes of what happened with your latest projects, obviously not private information, but you get what I’m saying.

Gwyneth Pena:
Private data.

Mike Pfeiffer:
Yeah. That would be really cool, but it’s cool to think the different modalities. You could write, you could do video, you could do audio.

Gwyneth Pena:
There’s so many opportunities out there.

Mike Pfeiffer:
So many opportunities. So it’s really fun. Well, Gwen, it’s been amazing. Where should we send people to catch what you’re working on? We know YouTube. We’ll put that in the show notes, but what’s the name of the channel and where else should we be looking for content?

Gwyneth Pena:
Yeah. So I guess my hub of even like the behind the scenes of like what I’m working on and producing, eventually I want to do, like this is how I produce this podcast and throw it on YouTube. So it’s youtube.com/madebyGPS. Everyone always asks me like, what does GPS stand for? It’s just like my initials. They always kind of think it has like a deep meaning like, oh, is it like you found yourself, like GPS locations. Nope, nope, nope. It’s just my initials.

Gwyneth Pena:
My Twitter is the same twitter.com/madebyGPS. Pretty active there, a little bit more than I want to be. It’s because Twitter is so distracting, but yeah. I’m always open to talking to people about cloud, so find me on those links.

Mike Pfeiffer:
There it is, everybody. Go hit the show notes, go follow Gwen, go check out what she’s working on. Thanks Gwen. It’s great having you on.

Gwyneth Pena:
Thank you. Talk soon.

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